Category Archives: Reading

Tackling the Cognitive Capacity Cap in College…

Tackling the Cognitive Capacity Cap in College Readiness – The Partnership for 21st Century Skills

Most students are ill equipped for college and most pre-college education in its current state is unlikely to change that. This may seem harsh, but I’ll go even further. Students can demonstrate the knowledge and skills embodied in state standards (common core reading, writing and arithmetic), and still be grossly underprepared for college. (The fact that so many students aren’t even meeting those academic standards is, of course, even more concerning.)
What is missing? Any recent report on college readiness will tell you (Conley, 2007). Skills like inference, analysis of data, interpretation of findings, developing hypotheses, defining alternative explanations, comparing and contrasting, developing cross-disciplinary insights, and providing relevant evidence for an argument are essential for post-secondary success. These skills are all about how complexly and deeply students can process, associate and evaluate information. It is about their skill in attaching meaning and weaving new knowledge into existing networks of understanding. As many have, we might reasonably call these thinking skills.(Stark)



Stark, Roger. “Tackling Cognitive Capacity.” Tackling the Cognitive Capacity Cap in College Readiness – The Partnership for 21st Century Skills., 19 Feb. 2015. Web. 19 Feb. 2015. .

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Freedom to Read is our mantra
We are celebrating our freedom- how about you? KSS OWLS – “we got spirit, how about you? ” #owlproud Who’s house? Owls house!
In contrast to our cart of banned books, not only to we lend a broad collection of books to teens, we give books away- free! Share the joy Canada. Visit your library now to celebrate choice and access.

Celebrate Freedom to Read Week
February 22-28, 2015
Freedom to Read Week is an annual event that encourages Canadians to think about and reaffirm their commitment to intellectual freedom, which is guaranteed them under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. (


“Champions of Free Expression.” Freedom to Read. Web. 18 Feb. 2015. .


Filed under Censorship, Library Events, Library Update, Reading

Young adults ereading rise….print preferred by everyone -Pew

A fascinating study on reading patterns and device usage.

As of January 2014, some 76% of American adults ages 18 and older said that they read at least one book in the past year. Almost seven in ten adults (69%) read a book in print in the past 12 months, while 28% read an e-book, and 14% listened to an audiobook.(PEW)

Some of these differences are even more pronounced if we narrow the focus to look only at those who read a book in the past year. Among these recent readers, young adults caught up to those in their thirties and forties in terms of overall e-reading: Almost half (47%) of those under 30 read an e-book in 2013, as did 42% of those ages 30-49. E-reading also rose among readers ages 50-64, from 23% in November 2012 to 35% in January 2014. However, the e-reading rate among readers ages 65 and older remains around 17%.

Though e-books are rising in popularity, print remains the foundation of Americans’ reading habits: Among adults who read at least one book in the past year, just 5% said they read an e-book in the last year without also reading a print book.

In general, the vast majority of those who read e-books and audiobooks also read print books. Of the three (overlapping) groups, audiobook listeners have the most diverse reading habits, while relatively fewer print readers consume books in other formats:

87% of e-book readers also read a print book in the past 12 months, and 29% listened to an audiobook.



Among all American adults, the average (mean) number of books read or listened to in the past year is 12 and the median (midpoint) number is 5–in other words, half of adults read more than 5 books and half read fewer.3 Neither number is significantly different from previous years.


ZICKUHR, Kathryn, and Lee RAINIE. “A Snapshot of Reading in America in 2013.” Pew Research Centers Internet American Life Project RSS. Pew Research Center, 16 Jan. 2014. Web. 25 Jan. 2015. .

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Thanks Kidsbooks COTLA .. New book picks…

Thank you to Kidsbooks , Phyllis Simon- again! For decades of service and reading inspiration to the teachers, students and book lovers in the Okanagan. Your travelling and talks are so rewarding and contribute to quality of materials our COTLA teacher-librarians replenish every year for our students. Thx for all your visits :-)


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BCTLA DEAR2014 intro

Reminder. Mark your calendars.
Monday, October 27th will be the 8th annual Drop Everything and Read event.
Watch for announcements and printable posters soon.

Details will be available at
Jeff Yasinchuk

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Freedom to Read Week 2

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by | 2013/02/27 · 9:45 pm

SI mag exploits swimsuits and villagers…?

It is SPorts Illustrated magazine swimsuit edition season. The magazine that launches model’s careers and often finds itself in hot water because of stereotyping is in the pot again. Should primitive villagers be in shots with supermodels, half-naked or not? What has a NY fashion model have to do with hunting in the desert anyway? Nothing? What is your thought? Exploitation? Or just silly fun? Read more at Huffingtonpost>

The second controversial shot, featuring Emily DiDonato in an African desert, also include a tribal-looking, half-naked man carrying a spear:

These shots tap into the West’s past obsession/fetishization with so-called savages, jungle comics and the like. Again: In a visit to seven continents, this image is what Sports Illustrated is using to represent the continent of Africa.

David Leonard, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies at Washington State University, told Yahoo! Shine he understands why some might find the pictures offensive.

“These photos depict people of color as exotic backdrops,” Leonard said. “Beyond functioning as props, as scenery to authenticate their third world adventures, people of color are imagined as servants, as the loyal helpers, as existing for white western pleasure, amusement, and enjoyment.”(Huffingtonpost)

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When did my daughter get more literate than I am?-Ian Brown

When did my daughter get more literate than I am?

Ian Brown
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jan. 19 2013, 8:00 AM EST
Last updated Sunday, Jan. 20 2013, 4:03 PM EST

Robert Herrick, poet, CC attribution

Robert Herrick, poet, CC attribution

At this point, my daughter, a second-year McGill University literature and art-history major, perked up: “Herrick? The poet?”

“No,” I countered. “Herring. The painter.”

“Oh,” she said. “Because there is a poet named Herrick.”

“Yes, I know.”

She looked at me. “Have you read Herrick?”

“Yes,” I said. “Of course.”(Globe and Mail)



Work Cited
Brown, Ian. “AS SHE RACES PAST ME.” Globe and Mail. 19 Jan. 2013: F1. eLibrary. Web. 08 Feb. 2013.


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Open Culture (@openculture) Franco poem for Obama

open_culture_white_normal.jpg Open Culture (@openculture)
2013-01-21 6:27 PM
James Franco writes poem for the inauguration. Read “Obama in Asheville,”

James Franco is an actor and writer. He is the author of the poetry chapbook “Strongest of the Litter” and the short story collection “Palo Alto.” His poetry collection, “Directing Herbert White,” is scheduled to be published next year. He received a Best Actor nomination in 2011 for his role in “127 Hours.”

Obama in Asheville

Asheville, North Carolina, is the birthplace of Thomas
Wolfe and the sometime residence of F. Scott Fitzgerald
When he visited Zelda at her institution;
He stayed at the Grove Park Inn, a grand stone edifice.
On the phone once, Cormac McCarthy lamented
The two added wings and the spa, and marveled
At the original structure, They pulled the stones
From the mountains and brought them down on mules.

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Amazon- rent to never own

As we learn from the digital paper cuts… Ebooks, corporate ebook industry, is squeezing tighter and tighter…

As Boing Boing’s Cory Doctorow put it in a blog post yesterday:

This fine print will always have a clause that says you are a mere tenant farmer of your books, and not their owner, and your right to carry around your “purchases” (which are really conditional licenses, despite misleading buttons labeled with words like “Buy this with one click” — I suppose “Conditionally license this with one click” is deemed too cumbersome for a button) can be revoked without notice or explanation (or, notably, refund) at any time.


The core issue might actually be a simple matter of semantics: when we click a digital button that is labelled “Buy,” we expect that we’re actually buying something. But we’re not buying anything, we’re licensing it. Just last year, the Supreme Court ruled that the first-sale doctrine does not apply to software — or e-books. Or apps. Nor pretty much everything you “Buy” online that doesn’t get shipped to your home in a cardboard box.

Those long End User License Agreements you have to read before you use a new piece of software? Those are are legally binding, because you’ve clicked a button labeled “Agree.” But for some reason, online retailers can label their buttons “Buy” when they actually mean “Rent,” and there’s nothing we can do about it save filing a lawsuit. (

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