Category Archives: Library Update

thank you Heather Daly and BCTLA

Thanks to my BCTLA, fellow TL members and President Heather Daly for your thanks and good wishes. OMG I can’t believe it! What a journey. My career as a teacher since 1980 has been varied and rewarding. My chapter as a teacher-librarian was such a challenge, delight and motivation. Our school libraries in BC contribute so much to our kids education. 

My reflections- https://ksslibrary.wordpress.com/2015/06/23/climbing-the-teaching-mountain-a-reflection/

I thank many professionals but now especially you, Heather Daly. So many of my BCTLA colleagues have been supporters and motivators for my TL pursuits. My short stint on the BCTLA Executive was inspiring and illuminating. My predecessors hooked me with the advocacy concept and helped me raise my game- the challenging and vital role as a school librarian. People like Sylvia, Karen, Val, Bonnie, Gordon? Etc and you Heather, were such beacons of excellence for me. Furthermore, my own network expanded with TL’s like Jeff Yasinchuk and Nicola Kuhn. The social media world was exploding and my BCTLA connections matured.

    

Me and my stalker TA, Elspeth. 2014

 

 There was a time I felt like a such a novice until the BCTLA experience gave me confidence and a vision that I knew I could contribute.  I now have great memories and professional satisfaction but also many TL contacts around the globe. Our PSA has been sustaining and proactive. #bced is so enriched by you all. 

Your contributions Heather, on programs and governance has been so exemplary and unsung! I plead daily with my TL colleagues to get involved, not just for school libraries but their own individual job satisfaction. I celebrate my exit today because my career was rewarding not simply a job.  I now have 2 stellar teacher-librarians, supported by their LSA, sustaining our investment in the KSS program. Our teens will be well served.  I was so lucky to inherit a vital school library with Kay Treadgold and share developments with Sharon Bede. We have been the lucky ones and our school learning community has been rewarded. 

I humbly acknowledge that our school now lives the spirit of a school learning commons and it is a contribution to public education in Kelowna.  The legacy is that our program is bigger any one individual.  This TL goal would not be realized without the support of COTLA and the BCTLA. My own district and local Admin deserve credit too for giving us and other schools their support and confidence. Regardless of how hard you may build capacity in your school or advocate for libraries, success is measured by attributes of a culture that embraces it’s library. 

thank you so much Heather for your contributions, not just of my growth, but for your commitment to empowering our teacher colleagues with progressive methods and insight. There are many stronger libraries today because of your influence and many others that have been rescued from political bonfire. 

Thanks, with love, 

Al Smith, Kelowna. 
******************

On Wednesday, June 24, 2015, Daly, Heather <HDaly@sd43.bc.ca> wrote:

Good evening,
 
This school year was a challenging one which began with a prolonged strike and the loss of a beloved member of our teacher-librarian community. The ramifications of the strike affected BCTLA’s financial and operational capacity. Thanks to a successful BCTLA 75th anniversary gala dinner and conference, we will begin the next school year with only moderately lower finances and membership. This year saw additional successes, including the launch of From School Library to Library Learning Commons: A Pro-Active Model for Educational Change. Download the document at http://bctf.ca/bctla/info/learningcommons.html and watch the webinar at Learning Commons Webinar – January 28h, 2015. 
 
 
Upcoming professional opportunities:
 
* Join us on August 31 for the BCTLA Summer Institute: Makerspaces (9:00 to 4:00, Two Rivers Art Gallery, Prince George). Where does one begin with makerspaces? Learn what works best from some K-12 makerspace pioneers! Next, try it out at the Two Rivers Art Gallery MakerLab and take away some practical makerspace ideas for your library or classroom. More information about the summer institute, including registration details, can be found at http://bctf.ca/bctla/info/pro-dev.html.  
 
* Planning for the 2015 BCTLA conference in Surrey is underway. This year’s theme is, “Charting New Paths” and the keynote speakers are Lyn Hay and Lee Watanabe Crockett. For more information, check out the conference website at http://bctlasurrey2015.weebly.com/.   
 
Thank you and congratulations:
 
Thank you to the 2014-15 BCTLA Executive: Heather Daly, Grahame Rainey, Devika Chudy, Ann Titford, Moira Ekdahl, April Hilland, Emiline Downs, Maria McAllister, Wendy Amy, Patricia Baisi, Gordon Powell, Marilyn Lunde and Rhea Woolgar. Thanks also to those individuals who have retired from the Executive this year—Jeff Yasinchuk, Sylvia Zubke, and Lindsay Ross—for all of their contributions. Thank you also to the BCTLA Chapter Councillors and to all of our Chapter Executive members, to our formal liaison representatives to other associations, and last but not least, to our Members and Subscribers.
 
Congratulations goes out to the incomparable BCTLA President’s Award winner Al Smith and to an amazing BC Teacher-Librarian of the Year, Sylvia Zubke. Al and Sylvia are two of our many incredible teacher-librarian colleagues retiring this June. Congratulations, Al and Sylvia! We love you and wish you and all of our retiring teacher-librarian colleagues all the best!     
 
Have a great summer!
 
Thank you for your continuing support,
Heather Daly
BCTLA President
 
 
Connect with BCTLA: Website | Twitter | FaceBook | Pinterest | YouTube | LinkedIn | UStream | Forum (listserv)
 
View your membership/subscription expiration date and renew online at http://tiny.cc/JoinBCTLA.

Leave a comment

Filed under BCTLA, COTLA, Library Update, Personal Learning Network, School Library, Teacher Professional

Climbing the teaching mountain – a reflection

So I finally reached my summit. After 35 years of teaching, I’m hanging up my teacher gear- bag, tools and first aid kit. I write perhaps with with far too much sentimentality but with sincerity. Most of you know I hold little back. :-)

I use the my beloved mountain climbing hobby as a metaphor.  it seems an appropriate device but I am a reader not a writer. Like climbing rock, a gradual and arduous task, despite the glory of reaching various summits, has crux and crag. As a teacher, we experience some heavy lifting. Being a professional is never easy but the  current generation of colleagues embrace a task more complicated than my own. I write to my predecessors but mostly my junior colleagues.  Teaching need not be just one trek but a series of climbs and opportunities. You have to work at something. Try to love what you do. Forget ‘missionary zeal’ just have fun whenever you can. Your authenticity is what makes you unique and worthy of guiding our grandkids. 

  

I notate ‘opportunities’ because I’ve been a lucky teacher to have dabbled for 35 years in a variety of professional assignments.  SD23, despite my frequent rants of impatience, has offered me transitions and opportunities that met my diverse yearnings.  From teaching high school PE to eventually landing my dream job as teacher-librarian at Kelowna Secondary, I respect the flexibility our District accommodated my professional growth.  I never dreamt or planned on a library career but maybe that’s why it’s worked out so well for me- I had passion and insight when the door opened. I have taught something to ever grade K to 12.  It’s been a trek not a stroll in the park but I only wish the same to the talented hard working educators behind me. 

In 1981, I took an temporary assignment as a PE teacher at KLO Secondary, as this was my major and obsession at the time, I was naturally delighted.  Jobs were tough to acquire in 1980, so it was a timely opportunity. I was soon pulled out and asked to teach a Grade 7 class at Raymer Elementary because of an urgent vacancy. Having completed half my SFU practicum in elementary school in Vernon, it was fortuitous. I loved my novice years at Raymer but mostly it affirmed my career choice as an educator.  I have now taught these students’ children- a surreal but rewarding experience. Many of my predessors have commented on the same truth. Kids, and teachers come and go. 

I moved schools initially because an admin/mentor Al Stonehouse argued that 5-7 years at a school is the most impactful.  Off to Hudson and Pearson Elementary, where I learned the art and science of teaching and had many terrific experiences and relationships. I explored other curricula and the burgeoning education technology  field, including post-graduate studies at SFU. The experience was a trek that almost broke me but I acquired new insights and many skills. This phase was a series of small delightful hikes as opposed to an ‘Everest’ expedition. I was taxed but now I knew I wanted to try other destinations.  I had the encouragement of District staff to attempt a revisit to high school. They had an opening at Mount Boucherie Secondary School in the Ed-Tech field so as the manic risk-taker I can be, I gave my k-7 binders away and brought my Apple Mac Plus to high school- 20mb drive and all! 

Although I had the chance to venture out and explore interests like fine arts, outdoor education, and even some special education, my focus was on an information technology program. At the time, it was an alien notion. It wasn’t business or computer science but a new field trying to react to the new internet world.  What I didn’t comprehend was that my trek through elementary instruction and technology, not PE, would lead me to a career as a teacher-librarian. A novel ascent I never even considered, never mind aspired to.  I spent hundreds of self-taught hours and grabbed many courses and workshops along the way but I would soon be transformed as a librarian. 

By the opportunity of solving the dreaded timetables and the foresight of my colleague, Sharon Bede, I found myself hiking into the library one September day. I am a man for challenges, fed by, as I know now, my bipolar disorder; :-) so I naturally headed up the trail without much planning or awareness.   There would be nasty MBSS Bears on the trip but I wasn’t afraid- I was young and stupid.  Sharon asked the administration to fill the 0.3 TL with me rather than search outside. In my naive- and yes, manic, compulsive manner, I said yes. 

I loved the interaction with staff and the diverse curricula.  I was a voracious reader, so it seemed prudent to build on the opportunity to stretch myself. I went back to school and lifted my professional development up this unique unpredictable climb as a librarian.  I had Bede as a guide, so I wasn’t going to fall in a crevasse! I was delighted with the burgeoning new role of school libraries and could see that my resume would equip me well. I had so many rewarding and fascinating years at Mt. Boo. I worked with so many master teachers, like Bede, Colin Castle, Rob Eikenaar, Lois Flavelle, Bob Dickeson, Catherine Heymen, Barry Kingsley and Don Treadgold to name a few. People like Hugh Gloster, Dave Swanzey and Terry Bush, who showed confidence in me to lead students into the alpine, emboldened my sense of value as a teacher. I had opportunities like travelling to Europe with Rob Eikenaar, other chaperones and senior students, including a trip with my son to Italy. I have so many fond memories of our adventures but it was librarianship that had become my new obsession.  The Library at MBSS was so valued by the school it felt like an honourable vocational to aspire to. I was an impatient man who needed change but the librarian role felt appropriate and enduring.

I hated to leave my dear friend and supporter, Sharon, but the door opened up for a transfer to Kelowna Secondary School as a 0.5 part-time librarian. The timing was perfect for another new trip. My children were going to enter KSS and as a lifelong coach, participating with my children in their sporting life was ideal. Having my children at my alma mater seemed a sentimental but practical option.  I knew Kay Treadgold, the award winning TL at KSS, and was assured the Owls were a good choice.  knew I was fortunate to find another expert guide, not just for librarianship but my life. 

I have playfully called myself, a ‘Sherpa-librarian’ because I realized I too had become a library guide. My expeditions were scary, venturing into the Internet with students. There was resistance.  Not everyone was a willing member of the digital reality but Kay kept me motivated and resilient, especially when we both planned and moved to a new library at the newly built KSS at Raymer Ave.  Leaders like Rick Shave, Craig McLeish and Bill Lang invited me into the process. I could contribute to the building of a new Everest expedition. Kay and I could design and plan a newer vision of school libraries by constructing a facility that would take us out a dark old library into a large bright centre that could provide teaching opportunities we only dreamt about. The training and new gear set us up to deliver services to a school that we knew would be embraced by fellow trekkers. 

We soon found ourselves putting the expedition into high gear when Principal, Susannah Brown, encouraged our vision. Our energetic, passionate staff soon joined us in a progressive approach to a school library program. Unlike the old stereotype, our library was not wear old teachers go to pasture.  We were not your ‘grandmothers library’.  I think our friend Sharin Bede, at MBSS, was now envious but always a cheerleader, along with our friends at the Central Okanagan LSA. It was a heady time with many new potential methods, resources and curricula to explore.  Wow! I had found myself on a trek into the high alpine. I was on an ascent of Everest of soon I would be rejoined by Sherpa Bede- the Hungarian guide extraordinaire. 

With some trepidation, knowing Kay was retiring soon, we found ourselves in a crux. Finding a top notch TL to replace Kay was a daunting ascent.  This time, Susannah Brown was the guide who had a map. We would recruit, steal, bribe Bede to cross the bridge to the dark side. Now how could I not be happy? Luck, Grace or Brown’s divine  intervention, I had my partner back. Kay could not be happier. Win. Win. 

Now I’m saying that my journey wasn’t without blisters, scrapes and fatigue. I battled personal  issues for years. I had spells of bad health and personal challenges but my fellow professionals helped pick me up- literally. We sadly have just witnessed Sharon’s health ordeal. Colleagues get sick, transfer, retire- whatever. It’s life.  Life intervenes, like the weather, and one can’t direct every course but only dress for the cold and wet, hoping for sunshine. My vocation had intimately become part of my life over the years. Colleagues, and even students have guided me to safety.  KSS rescued me from the abyss many times.  I could not have climbed my mountains without the help of fellow hikers.  I like to think I grabbed a hand or two over the years.  Like my friend and hiking mate, Roger Kirk, says, “not arriving home safe isn’t an option. Safety first.” Look after yourself. Put the safety of your family first. JSS thrives as a team effort.

Last year, with fellow teacher Sherpas, Kirk, Moisan, and Pendray, I fell short of summiting Mount Rainier, but succeeded nonetheless. I reached new high ground.  Teaching has been like mountaineering, you aspire to some insane, lofty goal but enjoy the trip regardless of what altitude or landmark you accomplish. You ascent as a team but not every person summits. That is the way.  The school library program at KSS became my Rainier and I climbed it. 

Teaching is a very intense demanding human service. It’s a very honourable profession with very little respect and a modest renumiration but the rewards can be a personal and social journey. We occasionally can find solace, if not glory; like when we see girls grow into women and boys into men.  I’m always humbled by the huge transformation we can see in our teens.  We sometimes cannot believe our eyes. Periodically, like sunshine after a storm,  they even seek you out and thank you for being there- as a cherished guide- a compass.  During my career, I have had alumni connect and share their gratitude.  Although rare, even parents write letters of gratitude.  Our career is a sacred one. Cherish it. Defend it. Our efforts are respected, even admired, by the coalition of the willing.   

Those moments of dignity, help heal the frustration and isolation that many of our fellow Sherpas periodically feel. When the cycle of despair occasionally hits you- and it will- lean on your fellow climbers and focus on your own family. If you stumble or find yourself exhausted from the trek, remember that any hike is a reward in itself and ultimately, you grunt your way uphill for them. 

With love, devotion, and fond memories,

Your Sherpa-librarian,

– Al Smith, KSS 1999-2015

_____________

A few images to reflect my journey…

   
Outdoor Ed, MBSS, ‘I really took teens up here!’ 

Every new climb is a new success    

Nancy and I trekking skis up Kokanee Glacier- on a weekend! Really? Youthful indiscretion 

  

  

It takes all kinds of Sherpas. These ladies can carry a heavy pack.

  

excellent service, including access, welcoming scholarship and things like free books…

  

Despite hazards like Sharon’s absence, 2015 was a special year. Thank you

  

COTLA. Fellow Sherpa-librarians

      

Remember, witnessing students apply your guidance and strategies, large or small,  is a landmark event.

  
Athletic challenges at KSS, as player, coach or organizer, since 1973! A rare tradition 

  

Not all accomplishments are on mountain tops. Sometimes it’s just getting yourself a new glorious view.
   
Chez Moisan- Preparation need not be complicated. 
  
  
  
 

Celebrate every hill. You earned it. 

  

Integrate your personal experiences into your classroom world.

  

Find gratifying ways to convert one success into new endeavours

  

Experiment – take chances with things that you love. [ like trying to paint the ones you love ;-) ]

   
  

Grad ‘speed dating’ – we host WWII & WWIII

  

Gotta love teens make themselves at home :-)

  

Even big kids can read little kids big books. These 2 read aloud Henry Climbs a Mountain, ” you mean you guys have that book?!” Cute. 

Some students learn to own it. 

   

Access and opportunity- the rest is up to them


Authentic traditions are worth the effort to uphold.  

 

Thanks Pierre, for being my Sherpa! 

3 Comments

Filed under Editorial, Library Update, Personal Learning Network, Photos, Professional Development, Reflective Learning, School Library, Teacher Professional

Freedom to Read is our mantra

http://www.freedomtoread.ca
We are celebrating our freedom- how about you? KSS OWLS – “we got spirit, how about you? ” #owlproud Who’s house? Owls house!
In contrast to our cart of banned books, not only to we lend a broad collection of books to teens, we give books away- free! Share the joy Canada. Visit your library now to celebrate choice and access.

Celebrate Freedom to Read Week
February 22-28, 2015
Freedom to Read Week is an annual event that encourages Canadians to think about and reaffirm their commitment to intellectual freedom, which is guaranteed them under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. (Freedomtoread.ca)

IMG_3377

__________
“Champions of Free Expression.” Freedom to Read. Web. 18 Feb. 2015. .

2 Comments

Filed under Censorship, Library Events, Library Update, Reading

the KSS Library- the road to a collaborative learning community

ajNEWsmall

Our mission is to contribute resources and professional services to the broad learning community at Kelowna Secondary School.  Our committment to supporting achievement through instruction and collaboration is as proud as the traditions that deep throughout our school culture.  Whether through enriching the reading culture or implementing various connected learning strategies, the staff at the KSS Library wants to showcase some the aspects of our program but also the larger collaborative learning community.  The Learning Commons ( see a few pics )   provides students an environment for researching, reflecting, creating.  The Library program integrates instruction and resources services in a collaborative teaching model.  Our services reach out to the school community through direct face to face collaboration all day, five days a week. It extends with assets and service points on the public web, school portal, an extensive virtual library, blogs, and social media.

finditFB  TWitter_ad-2ASK_ad-2 the KSS Library >>>>

Leave a comment

Filed under Announcements, Library Update, School Library

A school library is many things…

We have many academically inspired moments or literary events that occupy our school day at the KSS Library. Our Learning Commons is often a hub of intensity for faculty, classes and always packed with teens intently completely projects, seeking materials or cramming for some exam. Our Commons is designed to tackle these scholarly pursuits but it also keenly functions as a safe social space. Occasionally, we just get teens seeking solitude or quiet reading. Our staff tries to protect this role, despite the bustling pace as a technology and creation hub. Example being our sunny reading lounge. Yes. And comfy chairs. :-)

Comfy

Leave a comment

Filed under KSS Student Body, Library Events, Library Update, Photos, School Library

Freedom to Read Week 2

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Leave a comment

by | 2013/02/27 · 9:45 pm

Mission creep, hi-tech , another year to re-evaluate

Mission Creep? Libraries and 3D Printers? What?

In response to a recent blog post I read by Hugh Rundle .(http://hughrundle.net/2013/01/02/mission-creep-a-3d-printer-will-not-save-your-library/ )

I get the urge to provide modern powerful tools that help our patrons/students to learn. Emphasizing the phase of creation/production to the information inquiry cycle makes sense in 2013. Developing a learning commons in a high school makes sense but like embracing 3D printers, iPads or other high tech innovations the risk is we lose our fundamental core virtues.  A new Learning Commons without a trained teacher-librarian is like the open pool without an instructor or life guard.

nerioxman____01Hugh Rundle’s thesis of mission creep;the frenzy to embrace technologies as the savior for library programs, may be a valid concern. Public, academic or school libraries all have unique missions and contexts as they strive to adapt and improve in this information age, but they all have a common obstacle- leadership that fails to discover and focus the decisions that hold sustainable purpose. The recent BC Libraries Summit ( http://commons.bclibraries.ca/inspiringlibraries2012/ )explored these issues.

Embracing technologies for its own trendy value is indeed a distraction, if not a major barrier.  Rundle calls it ‘technolust’!  Although my emphasis is a high school library, we do tend to model, lead and/or persuade our community with technology innovation. It has been a natural evolution of digital information realities; however, one truth is users/patrons have always come to the library as a reliable station for content, resources and advice whether it be a rare book, thesis support or 16mm film. The computing reality has been a natural progression of this service and is part of our culture. Our ‘technolust’, although present, is abated because of budgetary realities and policies but education in general suffers the same malady.

Change in libraries and in schools in general has occurred by two means. There is the determined targeted practice of leaders and practitioners who build programs and initiatives on the ground floor and there is just the inevitable absorption from wider social technological change.  I believe strong library programs must seek out option one.  A team of leaders who can collaborate and assess many views, options, and virtues of technologies that match sound program purpose.  An inspiring colleague of mine, Nicola at RSS, once encouraged me to embrace change with my site teammates to evaluate our mission.  It may sound cliche but it is necessary to avoid the creep Rundle argues against.

Grasping state of the art trends, like 3D printing is rather absurd when we may not be doing the fundamental needs effectively. I saw the one-to-one computing initiative come and go with very little advantage and certainly debatable sustaining education value.  There is notable benefits- always  is – but the cost/benefit ratio, training practivalities, pedagogical goals, cultural values and sustainability need to all be part of change.  I offer colour printing to my students, by request, yet the demand has been far less than I originally anticipated.  It’s convenience, no harm no foul, but the investment may not always match your aspirations. 3D printing output can illustrate concepts in very creative and informative ways.  It’s mazing stuff but… soon Staples or Costco will do it for our kids- dare I say from their phones?! . ( Engadget ) Watching Neri Oxman of MIT can give you the inspiration and rationale for 3D printing projects (YouTube ) but there are institutions and agents whose function it is to deliver more appropriate than a library. She synthesized iconic designs of mythology, story telling and architecture at the MIT MediaLab to produce ‘Mythologies of the Not Yet’ showcasing the potential of 3D printing from a design perspective.  I see the library’s role in her process as nurturing capacity of all three elements. The story.  The image. The technology. We should bring the climber to the mountain. Librarians should be the sherpa and assist the inspiration and the means not bring the mountain to the climber.

Re-assessing your mission is required before you thoughtfully decide which tools and practice you need to strengthen your program for the long term.

Leave a comment

Filed under Library Update, Professional Development, Public Libraries, School Library, Teacher Professional

Welcome TL Hastings.

Welcome TL Hastings. We’d like to warmly greet Mr. Jeff Hastings to the Library for 2012-13, who is covering Mr. Smith for 0.2 part-time this year. He will be serving the Library in various roles mostly on Fridays but you may see him he and there during the week. Mr. Hastings was a longtime teacher-librarian at George Elliot Secondary but the Owls won’t hold that against him. He has recently travelled and worked in Central America and is an avid book lover.  Welcome to our vibrant Learning Commons and Library Program.

Leave a comment

Filed under Library Events, Library Update, School Library

Celebrating 10 years of staff reading- library reception

The KSS Learning Commons was not full of teens today but staff. The Library staff was hosting our 10th annual Summer Reading Reception. A luncheon in the library where teachers, admin, support staff and guests all gather to browse new materials, borrow books and socialize with a light lunch. Often it is a pot luck affair with avid library supporters pitching in plates or service. We have door prizes, demos, and casual fellowship. This year we had a ‘literary lunch’ where all the food had a literature connection. Pink ink punch from Dr. Seuss to Papa Hemingway tuna and Frances Mayes lemoncello cake. …

Thanks everyone…

20120628-174612.jpg

20120628-174652.jpg

20120628-174731.jpg

1 Comment

Filed under Library Events, Library Update, Photos, Teacher Professional

A Commons crux- growing pains or success stories

REACHING A CRUX…. a learning commons update

A high school learning commons may seem like an oxymoron to some folks but to us it’s a happy educational stew cooking on a light boil. We are struggling with as our KSS Library has evolved. In no specific order…..just a few observations as we enter a busy June

1.) mission: even with a tradition and a school library culture of open access, literacy instruction and intellectual scholarship the purpose of a program is high-jacked by other agendas and mythologies. Reclaiming or re-purposing staff, schedules, services and resources in a timely fashion is not only costly but logistically challenging ( see JComfort >

2.) food: our site and student body are getting messier and messier. I am not a janitor. We are in serious shortage of custodial service already. It is an awful problem. Check out out student parking lot. My casual nature and love of the latte is conflicted but I also appreciate the need for a clean and healthy carpet. I do not wish the ‘learning’ side of learning commons to be invaded by the common sticky slurpy.

3.) space: I have the luxury of a large space at KSS yet I have to be a field manager and parking lot attendant or sometimes policeman. The demand is too great. I have been innovative and designed niches that are always utilized. When kids suggest they need to leave the commons area and find a quiet place to think or do work, I get very worried. There are no quiet environs in the building with exception of the broom closets!

4) laptops: lovely devices yet… unless I am booked at capacity with classes ( which is frequent ) I loan out ThinkPads to students by the dozens. To help maintain inventory for each block, I choose to barcode and circulate the units. It’s a hassle but I get them back. We cannot afford to have units all over the school when we need for a class next period (I do get circ data too)… but it can be so busy sometimes I feel like a laptop jockey….

5) patrons: the best part of any learning commons is students. The added bonus as a teacher-librarian is the professional rewards of serving and collaborating with teachers. Students receive a rich learning experience when we can engage with them and their teacher. Perhaps the most interesting and dynamic patron of our Library is the ‘casual’ or drop in student. As a senior high school we welcome an average of 1100 teens across our threshold each day. The resource period students, DL students, DIS students, teacher preps, etc and the am/lunch/pm crowd that uses the commons for reading or homework or whatever, is a diverse and unpredictable crowd. We serve a large and dynamic community. We are challenged to provide resources and develop new teaching strategies in a huge range of curricula.

6) books: the popularity and demand for print remains very high. “Good morning Ms. Bede, huuummm do you have any THINKING books?” Well there is a new expression we are going to

THOUGHTS?

Leave a comment

Filed under Education, Library Update, Personal Learning Network, School Library, Teacher Professional