Category Archives: Inquiry Resources

Beyond Five-Paragraphs

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rch&AN=95379320&site=ehost-live

Firstly, I’m a teacher-librarian not an English teacher. I don’t pretend to be an expert in either craft.  I’m commenting to support the thesis in Kimberly Hill Campbell’s article of Education Leadership ‘Beyond the Five-Paragraph Essay’. Years of research indicate the model isn’t a wonderful writing aide. So why are we still fighting it’s implementation in 2014?  Our school has mostly moved away from it in favour of other writing devices. As a librarian the outcome and eventual writing or production exercise does influence your course of action.

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“The five-paragraph essay format often puts students’ thinking in a box.  Ther’s a better way.”(Hill Campbell)

Many of colleagues have embraced a comprehensive inquiry model or PBL which starts with students generating big questions  not simply completing a  topic outline that fits 5 paragraphs or three boxes.  It’s valuable to emphasize organizational skills but in 2014 its finding personal meaning and filtering content within issues that is vital. Writing becomes a form of affirmation. Their writing is driven first by research and then by a deeper level of thinking.  Hill Campbell says, “developing an authoritative voice’. She claims the organization actually comes after the purpose of writing is generated- after the inquiry.  She discusses the virtues of not establishing predetermined formula of size or shape but let the student’s position statement and evidence dictate the organization and writing needs. I like her assessment.  Check her article out.

 

 

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Hill Campbell, Kimberly. “BEYOND The Five-Paragraph ESSAY.” Educational Leadership 71.7 (2014): 60-65. Canadian Reference Centre. Web. 14 Apr. 2014.< http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rch&AN=95379320&site=ehost-live >

 

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Celebrate Shakespeare on His 450th Birthday: Seven Ideas for Teaching and Learning

http://nyti.ms/1kvNvVw

macbeth_cummingAlan Cumming plays Lady Macbeth in a scene from a reimagining of Shakespeare’s tragedy “Macbeth.”
In honor of the Bard’s 450th birthday this month, and the surplus of Shakespeare in theaters as a result, we’ve revamped our main resource page, Teaching Shakespeare With The New York Times.

Lessons Resource Page>  http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/08/02/teaching-shakespeare-with-the-new-york-times/

 

 

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by | 2014/04/07 · 11:38 am

Organic food? Really? -CBC News #eng12ap

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Lest We Forget… Honour

It’s Armistice- Remembrance Day. There are few teachers more humble than I during this Holiday. My uncle and namesake, lies buried in Italy, killed at age 20. My father(1917-1983) was a four year veteran of the Europe campaign. (For another post ) We should also remind ourselves that war has many faces and textures. While we honour memories of Canadians who sacrificed their lives, or their youth, in the cause to suppress tyranny, war is found in our nation’s collective persona in other ways too. It brings out our values, prejudices and political character. History and libraries and archives preserve these records so others may learn from the past. Librarians archive those items that others perceive as old junk or protect what some people wish would simply be forgotten. Isn’t it wonderful that things aren’t just thrown out into the dumpster because they are old? Isn’t it special that someone cares for our collective soul enough to make it a life work to curate our nations past. Sometimes ugly. Sometimes heroic. Libraries and their librarians or archivist serve our needs when our consumerism mania cherishes only the new. Be thankful we had courageous photojournalist scrambling in the mud, next to our soldiers, documenting the unequivocal truth of war.
Support your local and national libraries. Support your local veterans. Support your Red Cross. Learn about the past because it isn’t just a human story, it’s an inoculation against future foolishness- even if only just one- you.
Lest we forget. Nov. 11th.

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20131103-051218.jpg(ALA) For Memorial Day, a World War I poster from our collection of world war posters: “Knowledge Wins…Public Library Books are Free”. This is one of several posters commissioned by the American Library Association. This particular poster was designed by Daniel Stevens, an American illustrator originally from Philadelphia, who was best known for his depiction of Western Americana scenes. During WWI, ALA created the War Service Committee, which established more than 30 libraries at training facilities and other encampments for soldiers.

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Equipment on the Beach at Normandy. The Normandy campaign became a brutal battle of attrition. The Allies tried to push inland. The Germans, holding the high ground, tried to throw them back into the sea. Both sides suffered terrible casualties. Progress was frustratingly slow, and battles often ended in stalemates.(George Metcalf Archival Collection)

Canadian Troops in Campochiaro. Under sniper fire, personnel of the Carleton and York Regiment advance up the steep main street of the mountain village of Campochiaro, Italy, 21 October 1943.
(Library and Archives Canada, )

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20131103-060354.jpgBritish Columbia, 1940. Canadians enlisted by the thousands when Canada declared war on Germany on 10 September 1939. The Canadian military grew to over 60,000 members in less than one month and individual regiments had little difficulty recruiting. Virtually each one represented a new family separated by war.(Library and Archives Canada)

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20131103-053551.jpgPropaganda on the Home FrontLoggers in Quebec sit down to eat breakfast. The two posters on the wall encourage them to focus on the war effort.(Library and Archives Canada, pa-123533)

…………………….
Works Cited

“Knowledge Wins–American Library Association Advocacy during World War I.” – Pictures & Conversations. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Nov. 2013.

“Remembrance Day Toolkit.” Canadian War Museum – Remembrance Day Toolkit. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Nov. 2013. .

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Teens and popular social media…

A summary of a few popular platforms:

1. Twitter is a microblogging site that allows users to post brief, 140-character messages — called “tweets” — and follow other users’ activities.
Why it’s popular
Teens like using it to share quick tidbits about their lives with friends. It’s also great for keeping up with what’s going on in the world — breaking news, celebrity gossip, etc.
What parents need to know
Public tweets are the norm for teens. Though you can choose to keep your tweets private, most teens report having public accounts (Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2013). Talk to your kids about what they post and how a post can spread far and fast.
Updates appear immediately. Even though you can remove tweets, your followers can still read what you wrote until it’s gone. This can get kids in trouble if they say something in the heat of the moment.
It’s a promotional tool for celebs. Twitter reels teens in with behind-the-scenes access to celebrities’ lives, adding a whole new dimension to celebrity worship. You may want to point out how much marketing strategy goes into the tweets of those they admire.

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2. Instagram is a platform that lets users snap, edit, and share photos and 15-second videos — either publicly or with a network of followers.
Why it’s popular
Instagram unites the most popular features of social media sites: sharing, seeing, and commenting on photos. Instagram also lets you apply fun filters and effects to your photos, making them look high quality and artistic.
What parents need to know
Teens are on the lookout for “Likes.” Similar to Facebook, teens may measure the “success” of their photos — even their self-worth — by the number of likes or comments they receive. Posting a photo or video can be problematic if teens post it to validate their popularity.
Public photos are the default. Photos and videos shared on Instagram are public and may have location information unless privacy settings are adjusted. Hashtags can make photos even more visible to communities beyond a teen’s followers.
Mature content can slip in. The terms of service specify that users should be at least 13 years old and shouldn’t post partially nude or sexually suggestive photos — but they don’t address violence, swear words, or drugs.

3. Snapchat is a messaging app that lets users put a time limit on the pictures and videos they send before they disappear.
Why it’s popular
Snapchat’s creators intended the app’s fleeting images to be a way for teens to share fun, light moments without the risk of having them go public. And that’s what most teens use it for: sending goofy or embarrassing photos to one another. Snapchats also seem to send and load much “faster” than email or text.
What parents need to know
Many schools have yet to block it, which is one reason why teens like it so much (Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2013).
It’s a myth that Snapchats go away forever. Data is data: Whenever an image is sent, it never truly goes away. (For example, the person on the receiving end can take a screenshot of the image before it disappears.) Snapchats can even be recovered.
It can make sexting seem OK. The seemingly risk-free messaging might encourage users to share pictures containing inappropriate content.

4. Tumblr is like a cross between a blog and Twitter: It’s a streaming scrapbook of text, photos, and/or videos and audio clips. Users create and follow short blogs, or “tumblelogs,” that can be seen by anyone online (if made public).
Why it’s popular
Many teens have tumblrs for personal use — sharing photos, videos, musings, and things they find funny with their friends. Tumblelogs with funny memes and gifs often go viral online, as well (case in point: “Texts from Hillary”).
What parents need to know
Porn is easy to find. This online hangout is hip and creative but sometimes raunchy. Pornographic images and videos, depictions of violence, self-harm, drug use, and offensive language are easily searchable.
Privacy can be guarded, but only through an awkward workaround. The first profile a member creates is public and viewable by anyone on the Internet. Members who desire full privacy have to create a second profile, which they’re able to password protect.
Posts are often copied and shared. Reblogging on Tumblr is similar to re-tweeting: A post that’s reblogged from one tumblelog then appears on another. Many teens like — and in fact, want — their posts reblogged. But do you really want your kids’ words and photos on someone else’s page?

5. Google+ is Google’s social network, which is now open to teens. It has attempted to improve on Facebook’s friend concept — using “circles” that give users more control about what they share with whom.
Why it’s popular
Teens aren’t wild about Google+ yet. But many feel that their parents are more accepting of it because they associate it with schoolwork. One popular aspect of Google+ is the addition of real-time video chats in Hangouts (virtual gatherings with approved friends).
What parents need to know
Teens can limit who sees certain posts by using “circles.” Friends, acquaintances, and the general public can all be placed in different circles. If you’re friends with your kid on Google+, know that you may be in a different “circle” than their friends (and therefore seeing different information).
Google+ takes teens’ safety seriously. Google+ created age-appropriate privacy default settings for any users whose registration information shows them to be teens. It also automatically reminds them about who may be seeing their posts (if they’re posting on public or extended circles).
Data tracking and targeting are concerns. Google+ activity (what you post and search for and who you connect with) is shared across Google services including Gmail and YouTube. This information is used for targeting ads to the user. Users can’t opt out of this type of sharing across Google services.

6. Vine is a social media app that lets users post and watch looping six-second video clips. This Twitter-owned service has developed a unique community of people who post videos that are often creative and funny — and sometimes thought-provoking.
Why it’s popular
Videos run the gamut from stop-motion clips of puzzles doing and undoing themselves to six-second skits showing how a teen wakes up on a school day vs. a day during summer. Teens usually use Vine to create and share silly videos of themselves and/or their friends and family.
What parents need to know
It’s full of inappropriate videos. In three minutes of random searching, we came across a clip full of full-frontal male nudity, a woman in a fishnet shirt with her breasts exposed, and people blowing marijuana smoke into each other’s mouths. There’s a lot of funny, clever expression on Vine, but much of it isn’t appropriate for kids.
There are significant privacy concerns. The videos you post, the accounts you follow, and the comments you make on videos are all public by default. But you can adjust your settings to protect your posts; only followers will see them, and you have to approve new followers.
Parents can be star performers (without knowing). If your teens film you being goofy or silly, you may want to talk about whether they plan to share it.

7. Wanelo (Want, Need, Love) combines shopping, fashion blogging, and social networking all in one. It’s very popular among teens, allowing them to discover, share, and buy products they like.
Why it’s popular
Teens keep up with the latest styles by browsing Wanelo’s “trending” feed, which aggregates the items that are most popular across the site. They can also cultivate their own style through the “My Feed” function, which displays content from the users, brands, and stores they follow.
What parents need to know
If you like it, you can buy it. Users can purchase almost anything they see on Wanelo by clicking through to products’ original sites. As one user tweeted, “#Wanelo you can have all of my money! #obsessed.”
Brand names are prominent. Upon registering, users are required to follow at least three “stores” (for example, Forever21 or Marc Jacobs) and at least three “people” (many are other everyday people in Wanelo’s network, but there are also publications like Seventeen magazine).
There’s plenty of mature clothing. You may not love what kids find and put on their wish lists. Wanelo could lead to even more arguments over what your teen can and can’t wear.

8. Kik Messenger is an app-based alternative to standard texting that kids use for social networking. It’s free to use but has lots of ads.
Why it’s popular
It’s fast and has no message limits, character limits, or fees if you just use the basic features, making it decidedly more fun in many ways than SMS texting.
What parents need to know
It’s too easy to “copy all.” Kik’s ability to link to other Kik-enabled apps within itself is a way to drive “app adoption” (purchases) from its users for developers. The app also encourages new registrants to invite everyone in their phone’s address book to join Kik, since users can only message those who also have the app.
There’s some stranger danger. An app named OinkText, linked to Kik, allows communication with strangers who share their Kik usernames to find people to chat with. There’s also a Kik community blog where users can submit photos of themselves and screenshots of messages (sometimes displaying users’ full names) to contests.
It uses real names. Teens’ usernames identify them on Kik, so they shouldn’t use their full real name as their username.

9. Oovoo is a free video, voice, and messaging app. Users can have group chats with up to six people for free (and up to 12 for a premium fee).
Why it’s popular
Teens mostly use Oovoo to hang out with friends. Many log on after school and keep it up while doing homework. Oovoo can be great for group studying and it makes it easy for kids to receive “face to face” homework help from classmates.
What parents need to know
You can only chat with approved friends. Users can only communicate with those on their approved “contact list,” which can help ease parents’ safety concerns.
It can be distracting. Because the service makes video chatting so affordable and accessible, it can also be addicting. A conversation with your kids about multitasking may be in order.
Kids still prefer in-person communication. Though apps like Oovoo make it easier than ever to video chat with friends, research shows that kids still value face-to-face conversations over online ones — especially when it comes to sensitive topics. Still, they sometimes find it hard to log off when all of their friends are on.

10. Pheed is best described as a hybrid of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube — except that you can require others to pay a premium to access your personal channel.
Why it’s popular
Pheed’s multimedia “all in one” offering seems to be capturing teens’ attention the most. Some teens also like the fact that they have more control over ownership and copyright, since Pheed allows its users to watermark their original content.
What parents need to know
It’s hot! According to Forbes, Pheed has swiftly become the No. 1 free social app in the App Store, thanks in large part to teens. Time will tell whether artists and celebrities will jump on the bandwagon and start using Pheed to promote themselves and charge their fans to view what they post.
Users can make money. Users can charge others a subscription fee to access their content, ranging from $1.99 to $34.99 per view, or the same price range per month. Note that a cut of all proceeds goes to Pheed.
Privacy updates are in the works. Kids should be aware that their posts are currently public by default and therefore searchable online.

11. Ask.fm is a social site that lets kids ask questions and answer those posted by other users — sometimes anonymously.
Why it’s popular
Although there are some friendly interactions on Ask.fm — Q&As about favorite foods or crushes, for example — there are lots of mean comments and some creepy sexual posts. This iffy content is part of the site’s appeal for teens.
What parents need to know
Bullying is a major concern. The British news website MailOnline reported that the site has been linked to the suicides of several teens. Talk to your teens about cyberbullying and how anonymity can encourage mean behavior.
Anonymous answers are optional. Users can decide whether to allow anonymous posts and can remove their answers from streaming to decrease their profile’s visibility. If your teens do use the site, they’d be best turning off anonymous answers and keeping themselves out of the live stream.
Q&As can appear on Facebook. Syncing with Facebook means that a much wider audience can see those Q&As.

______________________________________________________________
Thanks to COTLA. MISTY SMITH
Central Okanagan Teacher-Librarians’ Association (COTLA), President

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1Password one great solution for million reason$

https://agilebits.com/onepassword

Capture1PASSWI don’t typically endorse or even rave about any application, software or company  ( I’ve been known to rant some) but with the recent security worries a tool to manage your numerous accounts and improve your protection has to be a good thing.

It isn’t free. Maybe you can find something but I prefer the integrity and integration this CANADIAN company provides. I bought a 1Password for multiple platforms and the iOS app because I’m online for personal and work reasons on multiple machines and devices and as a librarian frequently use accounts and online purchases. I can pop from work PC to iPad to my iPhone and back home to my iMac and back and have my accounts and passwords- old and new sync safely. It took me awhile to clean up my accounts and reload them but AgileBits browser extensions make it pretty elegant.  Your can manage multiple profiles, enter text, logins, credit cards….

1Password is a comprehensive package and Agilebits offers other products and purchase options.

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SI mag exploits swimsuits and villagers…?

It is SPorts Illustrated magazine swimsuit edition season. The magazine that launches model’s careers and often finds itself in hot water because of stereotyping is in the pot again. Should primitive villagers be in shots with supermodels, half-naked or not? What has a NY fashion model have to do with hunting in the desert anyway? Nothing? What is your thought? Exploitation? Or just silly fun? Read more at Huffingtonpost>

The second controversial shot, featuring Emily DiDonato in an African desert, also include a tribal-looking, half-naked man carrying a spear:

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These shots tap into the West’s past obsession/fetishization with so-called savages, jungle comics and the like. Again: In a visit to seven continents, this image is what Sports Illustrated is using to represent the continent of Africa.

David Leonard, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies at Washington State University, told Yahoo! Shine he understands why some might find the pictures offensive.

“These photos depict people of color as exotic backdrops,” Leonard said. “Beyond functioning as props, as scenery to authenticate their third world adventures, people of color are imagined as servants, as the loyal helpers, as existing for white western pleasure, amusement, and enjoyment.”(Huffingtonpost)

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When did my daughter get more literate than I am?-Ian Brown

When did my daughter get more literate than I am?

Ian Brown
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jan. 19 2013, 8:00 AM EST
Last updated Sunday, Jan. 20 2013, 4:03 PM EST

Robert Herrick, poet, CC attribution

Robert Herrick, poet, CC attribution

At this point, my daughter, a second-year McGill University literature and art-history major, perked up: “Herrick? The poet?”

“No,” I countered. “Herring. The painter.”

“Oh,” she said. “Because there is a poet named Herrick.”

“Yes, I know.”

She looked at me. “Have you read Herrick?”

“Yes,” I said. “Of course.”(Globe and Mail)

 

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Work Cited
Brown, Ian. “AS SHE RACES PAST ME.” Globe and Mail. 19 Jan. 2013: F1. eLibrary. Web. 08 Feb. 2013.

 

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Being victorian.. interactive BC

 CaptureVCictorianGreat site..interactive and British Columbian
I have attached teacher and student resource.

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Open Culture (@openculture) Franco poem for Obama

open_culture_white_normal.jpg Open Culture (@openculture)
2013-01-21 6:27 PM
James Franco writes poem for the inauguration. Read “Obama in Asheville,” cultr.me/VlDOgP

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James Franco is an actor and writer. He is the author of the poetry chapbook “Strongest of the Litter” and the short story collection “Palo Alto.” His poetry collection, “Directing Herbert White,” is scheduled to be published next year. He received a Best Actor nomination in 2011 for his role in “127 Hours.”

Obama in Asheville

Asheville, North Carolina, is the birthplace of Thomas
Wolfe and the sometime residence of F. Scott Fitzgerald
When he visited Zelda at her institution;
He stayed at the Grove Park Inn, a grand stone edifice.
On the phone once, Cormac McCarthy lamented
The two added wings and the spa, and marveled
At the original structure, They pulled the stones
From the mountains and brought them down on mules.
….

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