Walrus magazine- now on display

http://thewalrus.ca/category/issues/2015-05/

Access>

https://my23.sd23.bc.ca/school/kss/staffroom/new/shareddocs/eread/Documents/thewalrus.ca-Time%20for%20Bed.pdf

https://my23.sd23.bc.ca/school/kss/staffroom/new/shareddocs/eread/Documents/thewalrus.ca-Emily%20Carrs%20British%20Columbia.pdf

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Time for Bed

Your kids aren’t sleeping enough—and neither are you

Health
by

Emily Carr’s British Columbia

An unsettling journey through the archives

Visual Essay
by

CaptureWalrusMAY

In 1884, the ban on the potlatch ceremony struck an additional blow, crippling an important mechanism for the consolidation of community and identity, and for the transmission of knowledge, property, and clan entitlements. Finally, as the twentieth century dawned, the landscape was increasingly ravaged by industrial logging practices. No longer was the natural world honoured as the seat of identity and spiritual connection, as it had been for millennia. Rather, it was aggressively reframed as a commodity, with Indigenous people struggling to find an equitable footing within the new economy. That struggle continues today.( Milroy)

When Elizabeth was three, social and emotional lags became apparent. “Alarm bells were starting to go off,” says Claire. She and Elizabeth began seeing an infant psychiatrist in Burnaby. The problem was a lack of sleep, but she had developed other behavioural issues that were more worrying. Elizabeth had several different diagnoses, including anxiety, a developmental coordination disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. (Children with chronic sleep deprivation are often misdiagnosed with ADHD, as both conditions result in distracted, frenetic, and grumpy kids.) The ADHD medication exacerbated Elizabeth’s difficulties, making it even harder to fall asleep. In addition, she developed a facial tic, and her emotions ricocheted up and down. When she told her mother, “My brain is crying,” the family….(Ashenburg)

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Ashenburg, K. (2015, May 1). Time for Bed. Retrieved April 22, 2015, < http://thewalrus.ca/time-for-bed/ >

Milroy, S. (2015, May 1). Emily Carr’s British Columbia. Retrieved April 22, 2015, < http://thewalrus.ca/emily-carrs-british-columbia/ >

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Mindmapping Our Presearch Notes: Seeing Patterns and Gaps

Originally posted on The Unquiet Librarian:

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For the last month or so, I’ve been working with a section of Honors 9th Language Arts (hopefully, another more comprehensive post coming on this endeavor later in the spring).   After completing a class study of To Kill a Mockingbird, the students selected a motif of choice and began presearching a topic of choice related to the motif.   After completing a presearch search term map and arriving at a narrowed topic (which I’ve blogged about earlier this semester), we moved forward with another and more focused round of presearch while using EasyBib to capture information sources and take notes.   After approximately two and a half weeks, most students had a body of notes on their focused topic.  However, after many 1:1 student conferences and a formative assessment of collecting and reading their notes, the teacher and I realized many students were struggling with:

1.  Recording relevant…

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NightOwl Theatre presents….

APRIL 29- MAY 2 , 7pm nightowltheatre@gmail.com    nightowltheatre@gmail.com

KSS2bbweb-poster

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Overtime- pulling books

Overtime- pulling books for an art project- Comparative Civilization. We forgot how awesome the art book collection was. Despite fabulous online galleries, virtual exhibits and databases, a set of great print material engages students with content immediately. We have best of both worlds. :-)

IMG_3708

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KSS Library hosting connected teacher workshops

Some teacher directed Professional Development at Kelowna Secondary School.  The KSS Library is sponsoring and guiding some workshops for faculty. The sessions will include brief demonstrations and exemplars of connected teachers and conclude with discussion and Q/A.  Small group or individual instruction and collaboration follows as requested later in the term. All workshops are in the Joseph Boyden Learning Commons. Breakfast served in advance :-)

finditFB

Workshop sessions for KSS teachers.
APRIL 22, 3:30-4:30pm
Social Media for Teachers
APRIL 23 3:30-4:30pm
Twitter for Professionals
APRIL 29 7:45-8:45am
Managing Resources

Connected Learning: using social media for instruction and assessment.

  • A) Social Media for teachers
    • Blogging for teachers- as a web page, discussion or PD platform
    • Blogging with students- as a writing and production platform
    • Twitter as teaching tool
    • Twitter for professional development

  • B) Online Multimedia

    • Streaming video options
    • Managing YouTube or other video

  • C) Curating print and online resources
    • Curating and evaluating resources
    • Using Annotated Works Cited tools for instruction, inquiry, and assessment
    • Social Bookmarking with Diigo,
    • Dropbox, and/or GoogleDocs as curating platform

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The cure for childhood obesity parents will hate


The editorial says schools should make exercise the norm by ensuring that mandatory physical education classes in elementary and high school.  But it’s not enough to have physical education.  It says physical education classes need to be long enough and vigorous enough to meet recommended activity levels and not just token nods to exercise.  It adds that schools need to cut sitting time by getting kids moving in class with short exercise breaks and what’s called kinetic learning.  (Goldman, CBC)



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Goldman, Dr. Brian. “The Cure for Childhood Obesity Parents Will Hate – Blog | White Coat, Black Art with Dr. Brian Goldman | CBC Radio.” CBCnews. CBC/Radio Canada, 30 Mar. 2015. Web. 30 Mar. 2015. <http://www.cbc.ca/radio/whitecoat/blog/the-cure-for-childhood-obesity-parents-will-hate-1.3014981&gt;.

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Struggles Realities of Student-Driven Learning and BYOD


As our technological world rapidly evolves and our social and work place environment changes, it’s unacceptable that we don’t address the low income demographic for anything not just schooling. The civility of our society cannot afford to only protect the 1%. Letting poor schools fend for themselves and not funding them to be progressive is akin to permitting slavery by justifying the economic benefits of free labour! 


National surveys consistently show that students in low-income schools are getting short-changed when it comes to using technology in school. A 2013 Pew study revealed that only 35 percent of teachers at the lowest income schools allow their students to look up information on their mobile devices, as compared to 52 percent of teachers at wealthier schools. (Schwartz)

-I personally think Giulucci below is over enthusiastic. Even with polite and engaged students, my experience is that the urgency if not obsession to txt is stronger than any force. Even college classes are now banning phones. People still txt and drive when they know it is severely hazardous. I think lesson design and engagement can only go so far. Although I implement every technology I can, I also have an explicit class management regime that includes a course of action for use and abuse of mobile devices. -Al Smith

Many advocates of using mobile technologies say the often cited issues of student distraction are just excuses not to try something new. Mark Giuliucci, a freshmen social studies teacher at Sanborn High School in New Hampshire, said it’s not the end of the world if a kid sends a text in class. “The way you discourage it is engage them in the activity so they don’t even think of sending a text,” Giuliucci said. “You’ve got to jump in and play their game or you’re going to lose them.”(Schwartz )



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The Story Behind the Anahim Lake School Viral Video

Originally posted on Big Rocks First:

Trent Leon, a student from Anahim Lake Secondary, takes a shot on his hero, Carey Price, on a recent visit to Montreal. Trent Leon, a student from Anahim Lake Secondary, takes a shot on his hero, Carey Price, on a recent visit to Montreal.

Mikel Brogan is the Principal of Anahim Lake School.  Last Friday afternoon, Mikel and I sat down in my office to watch a video telling the story of a young student from his school who had the chance to spend time with his hometown hero, Carey Price, a couple of months ago in Montreal.  Of course, the video was not a surprise for either of us as the preparation time, a week of filming in the school and the Anahim Lake community, and a crazy few days in Montreal had been pretty intense.  It had been six weeks of anticipation leading up to the release of the video on youtube.  After watching the video, it was pretty easy to predict that the video had an excellent chance of going viral.  At the time…

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Top 10 Psych myths debunked -TED Why education gets tricked ..

Cautionary tale. Learning styles are not science. They are myth. How many other themes to we impose on students that are based on narrow self interest, ‘systems’ sales or institutional mythology? 

Not long ago I recall our entire school undergoing a Learning Style Inventory. We bought products, booked rare ProD days and tried to find ways to transform our practice. No one really objected. Most had some fun but why did we believe this learning style program ( or any inventory) had efficacy? 

Our entire organization bought it- literally! Abstainers were written off as party poopers or unprogressive! Teased even! Results were fun like astrology charts but not education science. So why do we get ‘sold’ on these myths? How does a study become the next education reform? Why are experienced teachers, who usually filter out the bull from the curious, so often marginalized when they resist or raise doubts? 

I think it’s because educators so frequently have their heart in the vocation and desperately want to help, that they adopt practices out of desire not objective research. They are so loving they trust every ‘speaker’ who introduces a new idea . They comply with admin or leaders who tell them the pill to swallow is good for them. Our profession’s embedded good nature and care sets us up for following myths not sound pedagogy. 

Except, of course, as you’ve probably guessed, that it doesn’t, because the whole thing is a complete myth. Learning styles are made up and are not supported by scientific evidence. So we know this because in tightly controlled experimental studies, when learners are given material to learn either in their preferred style or an opposite style,( TED )


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“10 Myths about Psychology, Debunked.” Ben Ambridge:. TEDX Manchester, Nov. 2014. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.ted.com/talks/ben_ambridge_10_myths_about_psychology_debunked&gt;.

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A flawed assumption that the Internet simply replaces strong teaching practices of school librarians

It is such a deep sterotype that even in 2015, any librarian is just a keeper of books, that intelligent people think the Internet solves all just by its mere existence. That logic is akin to to ‘guns don’t kill, people do’ or that simply writing seat belt legislation stops automobile injury. Clearly, the education lobby that ignores the value added services of a teacher-librarian, in favour of only an adoption of more technology, is very misguided or doesn’t understand how students grow. People only know what they know- and unless one has experienced the exemplary school library program in action, they easily adopt flawed assumptions. Like the vintage photo below, the endearing imagery has become a barrier to reality. Not nurturing school libraries will indeed close libraries because these invaluable services are not frills but integral enterprises to any progressive schools. If the Internet and all its gargantuan bytes of noise were the answer then why have schools at all? Why should we desire coaches, piano teachers, doctors? Why not just ‘google everything? What have priests or mechanics? Why not just let us all be moulded by the machine? Technocractic oppression is still tyranny. Our children need more than a screen to look at, they need a mind that critiques and assesses right from wrong and truth from myth. Isn’t that what we want? 



In the broad constellation of professionals who make up public schools, it is important to pause and acknowledge the forgotten education professionals who aide and support teachers. These include the librarians, nurses, social workers, learning specialists, and guidance counselors. They contribute to the growth and development of our young people but often find themselves left out of broader discussions about the preservation of public education. They provide a range of critical support and intervention frequently invisible to us. Most certainly, their value has escaped the notice of so-called education reformers and politicians. All too often, these champions of a “new order” have taken aim at the forgotten teachers in their ever-expanding quest to cut public school funding.

“…With the advent of the internet and digital resources in particular,
the flawed assumption surfaced that these positions are no longer necessary. “

….To be clear, budget and personnel cuts have hurt the profession across the board. However, professionals in these areas bear greater risk, given widespread misperceptions about the essential services they provide that remain vital to public schools. …
Another equally hard hit position is that of the school librarian. Fifty years ago, it was inconceivable to imagine schools without appropriate library resources and the personnel to staff them. The disparity in library facilities, for instance, helped civil rights attorneys demonstrate the inherent inequality in segregated schools. With the advent of the internet and digital resources in particular, the flawed assumption surfaced that these positions are no longer necessary. Librarians remain important conduits for student support in ways that many might be surprised to learn. Contrary to popular perception, librarians do more than curate collections of dusty books; they teach critical research skills and often serve as the first destination for young people on the road to quality research.(Williams, Huffingtonpost) 

Article…. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/yohuru-williams/sense-and-sensibility-why_b_6409076.html



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Story Time. Image. Vintage Librarians. Christchurch City Libraries. Web. 11 Mar. 2015. <https://www.flickr.com/photos/christchurchcitylibraries/sets/&nbsp;72157633383010966/>.

Williams, Yohuru. “Sense and Sensibility: Why Librarians Remain Essential to Our Schools.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 2 Jan. 2015. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://www.huffingtonpost.com/yohuru-williams/sense-and-sensibility-why_b_6409076.html&gt;.

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