Category Archives: Professional Development

Beyond Five-Paragraphs

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rch&AN=95379320&site=ehost-live

Firstly, I’m a teacher-librarian not an English teacher. I don’t pretend to be an expert in either craft.  I’m commenting to support the thesis in Kimberly Hill Campbell’s article of Education Leadership ‘Beyond the Five-Paragraph Essay’. Years of research indicate the model isn’t a wonderful writing aide. So why are we still fighting it’s implementation in 2014?  Our school has mostly moved away from it in favour of other writing devices. As a librarian the outcome and eventual writing or production exercise does influence your course of action.

pens_ages

“The five-paragraph essay format often puts students’ thinking in a box.  Ther’s a better way.”(Hill Campbell)

Many of colleagues have embraced a comprehensive inquiry model or PBL which starts with students generating big questions  not simply completing a  topic outline that fits 5 paragraphs or three boxes.  It’s valuable to emphasize organizational skills but in 2014 its finding personal meaning and filtering content within issues that is vital. Writing becomes a form of affirmation. Their writing is driven first by research and then by a deeper level of thinking.  Hill Campbell says, “developing an authoritative voice’. She claims the organization actually comes after the purpose of writing is generated- after the inquiry.  She discusses the virtues of not establishing predetermined formula of size or shape but let the student’s position statement and evidence dictate the organization and writing needs. I like her assessment.  Check her article out.

 

 

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Hill Campbell, Kimberly. “BEYOND The Five-Paragraph ESSAY.” Educational Leadership 71.7 (2014): 60-65. Canadian Reference Centre. Web. 14 Apr. 2014.< http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rch&AN=95379320&site=ehost-live >

 

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Filed under Book Reviews, Personal Learning Network, Teacher Professional, Periodicals, Professional Development

EDcampOK13- the unconference invades the valley

The Okanagan valley often has a problem of confronting noxious plants, alien weeds and foreign animals invading our delicate desert ecosystems. Some drastic actions are often required. Today the education unconference known as EDCamp was transplanted from lower mainland and other regions by @carolyndurley @clairethompson @naryn . Some trendy transplantation from foreign lands are toxic. EdCamp Okanagan had nothing noxious about it. It was a valuable and enjoyable way to engage with new colleagues. Thanks everyone.

20131102-155911.jpg So why would this old teacher and @literateowl bother to spend a Saturday indoors doing free pro-D? Well, firstly it’s free. It’s organized and driven along by teachers but mostly it allows free flowing discussion of big ideas that rarely get the time or light of day. Ideas like Genius Hour, Assessment, Chromebooks, social-emotional considerations, collaboration models….

We often work and even think in isolation. Twitter and Google+ etc have helped provide me valuable insights and knowledge about teaching but some face to face sharing in smaller groups was a worthy experience. It gives me insight and context when I’m planning or questioning my practices. It is a joy to listen and share to professors, superintendents, consultants, directors, kindergarten teachers, or private school math teachers. It is a joy to finally meet nose to horns, with colleagues from our neck of the woods, but who I know only virtually online. It’s also fun to affirm that my virtual perceptions of them were close but so completely inferior to meeting them in person. It renders hope that connectedness enriches us but doesn’t replace the value in gathering once in awhile face to face. OMG I met @nsearcy17 librarian !

I shared a book, Quiet, by Susan Cain, because I know some introverted and quiet types can get drowned out by well-intended extroverted bulls like myself sometimes. EDcamps do help bring a smaller setting for some. Participants can respond or add to Twitter stream if they like. I think we could do a better job of generating some silent writing or sharing out methods next time? Maybe a Google form? Or a EdCamp blog invitation? It would be good to find some small way to compensate for the noise bull moose like myself might make while we stomp up and down the professional landscape foraging on the great education topics voted on by teachers :-)

If you get a chance, attend an EDCamp near your neck of the woods.

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………………
Take Away:

1. Chrome books
@paulkellybc from Heritage Christian
Thorough demo and explanation of his school rollout of Google apps and $250 Chromebooks for senior students. Pretty sweet integration and student management opportunities. Nb. Also uses Moodle for courseware. Parent Permission forms. 25% of usual Tech service costs.
We discussed OS, platform, privacy, FOIPPA , apps issues.
#messyed great hashtag
Bottom line. They work very well for 90% of student activities.

2. Collaboration in schools. Don -District Admin. Penticton.
How to build teaching innovation, skills and capacity in collab way ? Culture? Set up Teams by topic:. Using collaborative models TF and others…. Adjust bells to build block times for teachers. Using 2 August days for early dismissal afternoons. Including some form of teacher created consensus and accountability important. School had mix of Short term and long term goals and time lines. See @nsearcy17 the collaboration deer

3. Integrating Technology . With Claire. Penticton district helping teacher.
Diverse group. Passionate topic and ideas for many. It cab empowering yet many teachers are overwhelmed with choices and technical obstacles.
Range of services from school to school and district to district a concern. Have or have not.
BYOD brings a need for planning.
Issues around Tech Dept vs Curric Dept. The need to have a curric road map is vital but difficult. Planning and skills dev tricky with rate of change. The average user/teacher now has computing power in his hands but not sure how to best use it? Not confident how to handle self-regulation/ devices with class management: there are mixed messages and value opinions in the community. Who’s job is it?

4. @Math_Johnson sucks ;-) LOL just kidding.

Reference

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. New York: Broadway Paperbacks, 2013. Print.

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Filed under Education, Personal Learning Network, Professional Development, Reflective Learning

Learning hub indeed-what would Steve say?

http://digitalis.nwp.org/site-blog/3pm-library-thoughts-media-technology-sp/5704

Interesting… A library not for books and information inquiry but socializing, technology and constructivism….? What?

‘Maker spaces’? Interesting notion but maybe just a fad? Like Mark Crompton recently blogged, ” “then we need to look at what kind of learning the library is the hub of” . My response? “I believe the kind of learning is driven by the school culture and the kind of hub is the proportional relationship of the library team and their assets and vision. The hub does not work in a vacuum nor does a strong learning school culture thrive without spirited and valued support services including the library program.”

Can KSS implement a ‘maker space’ model in the immediate future? No. Maybe…. Steve Jobs said during a Stanford commencement address, “Stay hungry, stay foolish.” He was provoking students to dream and innovate not with clinical business models but passion. Libraries as maker spaces? What role does a library play in any school- never mind the maker movement? So, what would Steve say?

20131028-235909.jpgThe wild notion of the maker movement may not impact us immediately. The learning commons model at KSS evolved organically not prescriptively. High school, like a teenager, has a hierarchy of needs. The role of the library is never an urgent or pressing one. Our library has successful served the needs of our school while adapting educational practice with solid tested pedagogy and some old fashioned trial and error luck. The teacher-librarians over the years have been competent advocates and leaders and faculty were very collaborative. We are the lucky ones. We have a great school. Now the very basis of sound pedagogy is in flux because with social change, now even role of schools is unclear. What’s a library to do? Some schools have no library or no librarian or neither. “They have the Internet, right?” “Kids these days, are computer savvy.” Ya, so? Public school, home school, if children no it all, why do we bother? Of course we know better. School is more than just 3Rs and learning is more than just a bunch of facts on a book or a – screen.

A quality school strives to serve everyone in progressive ways while staying committed to the mandate of curricular standards, exam expectations and graduation concerns. These factors and many more, can squeeze the creative and experimental capacity of educators and our library program is no different. We must firstly support our team while we may nurture innovation when and where we can. This takes time. That said, all our innovations evolve from some unique once crazy lonely idea. Change comes from need and inspiration. Learning and teaching is a complex process of experiences not just technology. Even the late Mr. Tech, Steve Jobs of Apple, said,
“Technology is nothing. What’s important is that you have a faith in people, that they’re basically good and smart, and if you give them tools, they’ll do wonderful things with them.”(Brainyquote)

I wish we would get over our obsession with device driven solutions for everything. It is faulty. Educational best practice is a series actions and relationships developed and enacted with intent. It’s about ideas, skills and the person. BYOD bring your own device should be- Bring Your Own Dialogue, Discourse or Dreams. Libraries are more than books. Libraries are more than spaces. Libraries are environments or biomes of ideas. So perhaps if some 3D printers, modelling clay or green screens were added to the book stacks and computers it wouldn’t really be so weird. I think the hangup is more about control than about having the gear.

With the reality of now having ubiquitous digital content, coming to the library to GET information is not the only role of the space. Information is everywhere. Kids grab raw data from their phone but they need help framing thoughtful questions and probing answers or more questions. Google queries don’t teach you how to read screens nor how to critically think. Finding quality appropriate information that challenges student thinking takes good teaching from the entire team not just access to the Internet. Sticking a laptop or a BYOD in front of a kid and assuming because of his age, the Internet will suffice as a lesson planning makes me ANGRY. It is negligence to not guide students through the reading of digital content and design mindful tasks that empower learning and not just plagiarized regurgitation. We owe them that much. My ideal ‘maker space’ would be a ‘make ‘em think’- first.

That is where a learning commons model comes in. Students get coaching all day even when outside of their classroom bell schedule. If faculty and teacher-librarian collaborate and share goals, methods and outcomes, a sophisticated learning hub can exist all day. Older teens CAN function at very high levels of inquiry and creative learning CAN occur in pockets or niches of activity. Quality designed lessons encourage students to reach beyond the teacher and the classroom and challenge the basic information. Investigate deeper for evidence. Students should be guided to create personal thesis statements and document reflections. Perhaps this is where the evolution of classroom, library, digital library, learning commons and maker space is revealed? Outcomes of evidence of learning are expressed beyond the quiz or written answer but in annotated and even constructed 3D models of data and the inquiry process. (Ekdahl)

At the the senior level, the redefining of ‘library’ space is coming whether we design it or fight it. I’m seeing it already- kids want service/access for digital content AND social flexible space. The KSS LIBRARY has organically been a learning commons before experts started calling modern library programs thus. Why? Because we provided multitasking, multipurpose, client focus service with learning, reading and scholarship as the core. If I was to teach another 5 years, I think I could see us implementing ‘maker stations’ rather like we do now with printers, scanners, AppleTV or paper cutters or iPads… IF we have the room? We would need to remove more stacks of useful books and renovate …but it won’t be me… ;-)

20131028-211117.jpg(mixed media by Hanna, narrative,topography,mathematics)

A warp in the commons universe I’ve noticed is the incongruence of opinion as to what the library should be. What is it? To a teen who only knows the library as a place to hang out and stay warm, being expected to demonstrate academic rigour or creative initiative now is a shock. To a student who only knows a middle school library as place to quietly read books, a senior high school learning commons is a busy, demanding and yes, sometimes noisy place. Today, I get asked a dozen times an hour, “May I borrow a laptop” or “why can’t I sit here?” Some students now see, a pre-reserved English 11 class, trumping their right to a chair or computer as an injustice! “What do you mean, I have to move or leave? WT? It’s my spare! It’s the library! ” The vast majority of our students though are fabulou, cooperative gems of youth but diverse expectations exist and I’m occasionally seen as the chair or laptop nazi.

When we don’t get feeder students until Grade 10, adopting cultural traditions or sharing community expectations of 2000 people is a huge challenge. If I simply MANDATE unilateral rules across the board, that doesn’t evolve into a healthy community of learning hub. I straddle priorities to serve teacher initiatives and open access for student centered projects like reading, homework or yes, creative endeavours. etc. Some exciting initiatives like ‘maker spaces’ tax space, people, inventory even further. With more kids working on personalized projects or streams, in an an open campus school, the learning commons model is a natural fit-but… It takes a welcoming well-equipped facility, supervision, support expertise and maintenance to keep the facility and clients all happy and productive. An effective learning hub for large schools is a challenge. Not unlike a classroom, on a grand scale, orchestrating all the elements and moving parts in a diverse collection of people and needs is as much art as science and a whole lot of faith.

It’s exciting. It’s busy. Both Sharon (and her temp Jeff) and I have been run off our feet but we really wouldn’t want it another way. Positive change needs energy. Nothing moves without inertia. The KSS Library currently is a healthy learning hub because the KSS admin, community and student culture supports it. Ultimately, success of any program is not about spaces but about people and relationships. Somehow it all just works. Like Steve a Jobs said, ” Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.”

It’s a nice problem to have- a competition for space and services. It is nice to be challenged by the competing needs of your services. It means the library is valued yet I also feel we(KSS) needs to re-evaluate the role of the school library and the teacher-librarian and design our own road map forward. It takes constant passionate coaching, encouragement and participation by teachers and administrators that THEIR LIBRARY is always focused on learning- a value added hub, as it were. Our Principal, Mrs. Kintzinger, has a goal for our school to be a ‘collaborative learning community’ where ‘ ‘Where All are Valued’. These are organic and people centered visions I would say. I’d say it sounds very much like a healthy library. What would Steve say? Is it hungry or crazy enough?
Again, Jobs was quoted, “Older people sit down and ask, ‘What is it?’ but the boy asks, ‘What can I do with it?’….So what can we do with it?

Works Cited

Crompton, Marc. “Bloom, Makerspaces and the Learning Commons.” Adventures in
Libraryland. N.p., 27 Oct. 2013. Web. 28 Oct. 2013.
.
Ekdahl, M., M. Farquharson, J. Robinson, L. Turner. 2010. The Points of Inquiry:
A Framework for In- formation Literacy and the 21st Century Learner.
Vancouver, BC: British Columbia Teacher- Librarians’ Association.

Jobs, Steve. Brainyquote.com Oct 28, 2013.

Jobs, Steve RIP. MacRumours. MacRumours, 11 Oct. 2011. Web. 28 Oct. 2013.
.

Kroski, Ellyssa. “A Librarian’s Guide to Makerspaces: 16 Resources.”
iLibrarian Blog. OEDB, 12 Mar. 2013. Web. 28 Oct. 2013.
.
Rebora, Anthony. “Latest Curriculum Craze: Making Stuff.” Teaching Now.
EDweek.org, 4 Jan. 2013. Web. 28 Oct. 2013. .

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literateowl.com @literateowl
_______________________
*******************Al Smith*************************

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Action and Reflection: Aligning and Mapping the Work of a Library to Its Community of Learning

Action and Reflection: Aligning and Mapping the Work of a Library to Its Community of Learning.

Thanks to BuffyJHamilton again…:-)

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a commons- is as rich as it’s people

I’m more convinced than ever about the power of libraries; school libraries in my case, IF, they are allowed to be nurtured like a garden.  Like a vegetable garden, the produce needs a dedicated farmer, great soil, and a staff of field workers. It needs nutrients, tending, and lucky weather conditions.  A school library needs all these elements too. In fact, I believe a great classroom has the same dynamic but a cross-curricular, openly public place like a library has some unique horticultural challenges.

IMG_1735It’s been a vacation break and another rotation of students has enrolled in our school since I’ve blogged about a school ‘ learning commons’ here or on the BCTLA NING. I’ve not just thought about the topics( I never stop thinking about our blessed library  (I’m getting therapy ;-) honest ) but I’ve also experienced some changes in this short time. Our students and staff evolve. The body politic changes. The leadership and curricula changes. New initiatives and new people pop into our realm. Some bad, sad and some exciting and fresh. This current class of kids at Kelowna Secondary School is blowing my mind. Just this Friday at 4:30! A young lady was challenging me to find a new book for the weekend- her last read was Ann Rand, the Fountainhead!  Quite the brief chat we had. Despite some very sad news ( my beloved TL partner Sharon is off fighting cancer ) the kids are pushing me into service points I’ve only dreamed of for years.  Just when you think you hit a wall, something blooms.

Students are demanding to know more about authors like Sherman Alexi, Atwood, Marquez! I think it is a combination of things,  including some great new teaching but there is an appetite for intellectual content and not just fluff. Smart kids are tired of pop BS. They are inquisitive more than ever and they are seeing their library as a destination and opportunity. That is unbelievable for this old goat who was getting a tad cynical. They are also overwhelming asking for books and not ebooks.  They are however increasing keen to learn how to reach our resources via their devices.  Seniors ( and their parents even) are now responding to our message about databases and citation tools and empowering inquiry. I’m in shock really. The transition has not been gradual but feels abrupt. I’m sure our constant grinding away has some role but there now is ripe ground for a learning commons model that preaches rigour with creativity. Don’t get bogged down about furniture or coffee or labels. Assess what your influential message is. How do your staff and students see you?

I’ve tried to make a few changes that could strengthen our model of delivery? Not sure, but here is a few. I acquired some new furniture. Why? to add serice.  A cafe tablke and stolls in the hall outside the library. Kids loving it so far. I’ve renamed and labelled our working areas by Canadian authors. I was sick of teaching people where north was- so enter Margaret Atwood, Farley Mowat, Joseph Boyden, Richard Wagamese, Marshall McLuhan, W.O. Mitchell. Maybe next year, I”l change names? Don’t know? So far so good. It’s created some eyes brows but conversations, if nothing else. :-) I’ve added stools around a round table with desktop computers and removed my OPAC computers to increase more student workstation space. I’ve added more desks and chairs( as study carrels ) on the end of my stacks. I’ve added two round tables behind two new teacher desk in each commons area to squish four more free seats for working students even if a class is booked in.  We have eliminated (weeded and reintegrated ) our REF section to make more shelf space for displays. Many are now digital anyway.  I’ve added 2 new book displays rather than a list. My own picks- fiction and non-fiction because students now ask me about the titles and it generates discussions and a visual target. I’ve added a couple small white boards for kids to write on- book recommendations… I’ve started to email and TXT new book covers to my blog and teachers directly as they arrive with a brief abstract or note.

cropped-photo-2librarychair-1On that note I don’t care if we have a learning commons or a library or a resource centre or just ROOM 255: I’m relevant for now anyway.  Hang tough. Work hard. Follow your passions and your skills. Have a great year fellow teacher-librarians- you all deserve more credit than you get. Your role is in BC education is huge. You plant the seed of universal access to lifelong learning through free and open access to content.  Libraries are more than just a room in a school.  They have been a cornerstone of a democratic ideal and tradition since Alexandria. Hang in there.  I say this because I believe you need to build a program and a place that is specific to your culture and gifts not just follow the popular norms of the education winds. Assess your needs. Build a delivery model. Develop friends. Do your best. :-)

The bottom line note here is that all the furniture, and nice shelving and display space if fabulous. I exploit it because I believe one’s visual environment is critical to learning but … it is the ever changing dynamic of adults and students that make things hum. We need constantly be re-assessing the human landscape not just the chairs because a learning commons is only as rich as its people.

- Al Smith

  music attribution.  Prine, John, McLauglin, Pat. Crazy As a Loon. Four Square, 2005. CD.

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by | 2013/09/29 · 6:20 pm

Congratulations Dayna Hart, Central Okanagan,

From:
Subject: Congratulations Dayna Hart

The 2013 winners of 2013 Gale/Library Media Connection TEAMS Award are Draper Elementary School in Eden, North Carolina; Constable Neil Bruce Middle School in West Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada; and Branford High School in Branford, Connecticut.

The TEAMS Award was created to recognize the critical collaboration between teachers and media specialists in promoting learning and increasing student achievement

Congratulations to Dayna Hart and Jenn Craig! They were named the winners of 2013 Gale/Library Media Connection TEAMS Award for the middle school category. They submitted a collaborative project called “Create a Civilization (Our Foray into PBL)”….and won the award.

They are the recipients of numerous prizes including a trip to the American Association of School Librarians conference in Hartford, Connecticut in November.

Please check out this link to read more about this prestigious award:
http://green.tmcnet.com/news/2013/09/10/7399664.htm

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Filed under COTLA, Library Events, Personal Learning Network, Professional Development, School Library, Teacher Professional

Bill Gates, Ken Robinson, and TED Are Coming To PBS

Bill Gates, Ken Robinson, and TED Are Coming To PBS.

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Filed under Education, Media Literacy, MultiMedia, Professional Development, Teacher Professional, technology

Mission creep, hi-tech , another year to re-evaluate

Mission Creep? Libraries and 3D Printers? What?

In response to a recent blog post I read by Hugh Rundle .(http://hughrundle.net/2013/01/02/mission-creep-a-3d-printer-will-not-save-your-library/ )

I get the urge to provide modern powerful tools that help our patrons/students to learn. Emphasizing the phase of creation/production to the information inquiry cycle makes sense in 2013. Developing a learning commons in a high school makes sense but like embracing 3D printers, iPads or other high tech innovations the risk is we lose our fundamental core virtues.  A new Learning Commons without a trained teacher-librarian is like the open pool without an instructor or life guard.

nerioxman____01Hugh Rundle’s thesis of mission creep;the frenzy to embrace technologies as the savior for library programs, may be a valid concern. Public, academic or school libraries all have unique missions and contexts as they strive to adapt and improve in this information age, but they all have a common obstacle- leadership that fails to discover and focus the decisions that hold sustainable purpose. The recent BC Libraries Summit ( http://commons.bclibraries.ca/inspiringlibraries2012/ )explored these issues.

Embracing technologies for its own trendy value is indeed a distraction, if not a major barrier.  Rundle calls it ‘technolust’!  Although my emphasis is a high school library, we do tend to model, lead and/or persuade our community with technology innovation. It has been a natural evolution of digital information realities; however, one truth is users/patrons have always come to the library as a reliable station for content, resources and advice whether it be a rare book, thesis support or 16mm film. The computing reality has been a natural progression of this service and is part of our culture. Our ‘technolust’, although present, is abated because of budgetary realities and policies but education in general suffers the same malady.

Change in libraries and in schools in general has occurred by two means. There is the determined targeted practice of leaders and practitioners who build programs and initiatives on the ground floor and there is just the inevitable absorption from wider social technological change.  I believe strong library programs must seek out option one.  A team of leaders who can collaborate and assess many views, options, and virtues of technologies that match sound program purpose.  An inspiring colleague of mine, Nicola at RSS, once encouraged me to embrace change with my site teammates to evaluate our mission.  It may sound cliche but it is necessary to avoid the creep Rundle argues against.

Grasping state of the art trends, like 3D printing is rather absurd when we may not be doing the fundamental needs effectively. I saw the one-to-one computing initiative come and go with very little advantage and certainly debatable sustaining education value.  There is notable benefits- always  is – but the cost/benefit ratio, training practivalities, pedagogical goals, cultural values and sustainability need to all be part of change.  I offer colour printing to my students, by request, yet the demand has been far less than I originally anticipated.  It’s convenience, no harm no foul, but the investment may not always match your aspirations. 3D printing output can illustrate concepts in very creative and informative ways.  It’s mazing stuff but… soon Staples or Costco will do it for our kids- dare I say from their phones?! . ( Engadget ) Watching Neri Oxman of MIT can give you the inspiration and rationale for 3D printing projects (YouTube ) but there are institutions and agents whose function it is to deliver more appropriate than a library. She synthesized iconic designs of mythology, story telling and architecture at the MIT MediaLab to produce ‘Mythologies of the Not Yet’ showcasing the potential of 3D printing from a design perspective.  I see the library’s role in her process as nurturing capacity of all three elements. The story.  The image. The technology. We should bring the climber to the mountain. Librarians should be the sherpa and assist the inspiration and the means not bring the mountain to the climber.

Re-assessing your mission is required before you thoughtfully decide which tools and practice you need to strengthen your program for the long term.

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Spark-Nora Young reprise…

http://www.cbc.ca/spark/episodes/

“Failing on the internet is essentially free… not like constructing a faulty building… buying a manual or taking a course to catch only gets you aware and skills of something that is already 2 years behind…”   “Fail as a way of learning”   -Seth Godin

If you haven’t followed Nora’s podcast/radio show I highly recommend you check her out. Topics and guests are very informative and applicable to education.

Homework: solve the digital divide at work.. write someone a handwritten note thank you note. 30 days after doing that you will see things change!

Spark 195: Pagination, Education, Participation

This week on Spark – new ways of learning, of reading, and of healing. Reinventing the classroom, writing for the now, calls for the end of pagination and for more participation online, and the evolution of therapy technologies. Just click the Listen button, or click here to download the mp3. For related links…

Archives/Podcast downloads/Subscribe : http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/spark-from-cbc-radio/id263242885

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Filed under Media Literacy, Personal Learning Network, Professional Development, Reflective Learning

Amazon- rent to never own

As we learn from the digital paper cuts… Ebooks, corporate ebook industry, is squeezing tighter and tighter…

As Boing Boing’s Cory Doctorow put it in a blog post yesterday:

This fine print will always have a clause that says you are a mere tenant farmer of your books, and not their owner, and your right to carry around your “purchases” (which are really conditional licenses, despite misleading buttons labeled with words like “Buy this with one click” — I suppose “Conditionally license this with one click” is deemed too cumbersome for a button) can be revoked without notice or explanation (or, notably, refund) at any time.

20121025-220452.jpg

The core issue might actually be a simple matter of semantics: when we click a digital button that is labelled “Buy,” we expect that we’re actually buying something. But we’re not buying anything, we’re licensing it. Just last year, the Supreme Court ruled that the first-sale doctrine does not apply to software — or e-books. Or apps. Nor pretty much everything you “Buy” online that doesn’t get shipped to your home in a cardboard box.

Those long End User License Agreements you have to read before you use a new piece of software? Those are are legally binding, because you’ve clicked a button labeled “Agree.” But for some reason, online retailers can label their buttons “Buy” when they actually mean “Rent,” and there’s nothing we can do about it save filing a lawsuit. (Nbcnews.com/technology)

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